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introduction to the reading of hegel summary

I was hoping Kojève would give us. read this not the Hegel original. For example F. Roger Devlin claims it is like calling Aquinas's Summa Theologica a mere introduction to Aristotle. Shit?). Marcuse credits the "new French interpretation" with showing clearly "the inner connection between the idealistic and materialistic dialectic", and lists Kojève's book as one of the key works. if i were to rate this "book" on the basis of the promise contained in its title, i would have to give kojeve an "F"; this is a *horrible* introduction to the reading of hegel. The stuff about the end of history and the master-slave dialectic has really stuck with me. Welcome back. I was hoping Kojève would give us some insight into understanding Hegel's use of language, but such insights were mostly operational (learning through use rather than explicitly examining the words to get at their meanings). Philosophy is a system that is to say an organized and closed all of whose elements are independent, knowledge and forming a unity embracing all elements of thought and life. So, while this book was at times revelatory and made me feel like I was this close to "knowing" Hegel's mind, Kojeve always then launched into a 10 page (might as well have been 1000 page) discussion of how we can draw "The Idea" "IN Time" or "OUTSIDE of Time" as a circle, or two circles, or a square with a dildo glued on it, or whatever. Preferred Title Introduction à la lecture de Hegel. INTRODUCTION TO THE READING OF HEGEL he would have conceived only a part of the human reality, and his system founded on this understanding of himself would necessarily be insufficient and false, to the extent that it lays claim to totality, as every system worthy of the name must. Philosophy and Wisdom To see what your friends thought of this book, Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit, Jesus H. Deceased Christ. You can go pages and pages without figuring out that he was trying to make a key point. hands-down the most profound reflections on hegel in the 20th C i have yet read--and from a russian frenchman, no less! So, while this book was at times revelatory and made me feel like I was this close to "knowing" Hegel's mind, Kojeve always then launched into a 10 page (might as well have been 1000 page) discussion of how we can draw "The Idea" "IN Time" or "OUTSIDE of Time" as a circle, or two circles, or a square with a dildo glued on it, or whatever. Can you add one? A Brief Note on Tactics, July 23, 2006 This book, an 'Introduction to the Reading of Hegel', is a collection of transcripts and notes collected and edited by Raymond Queneau, that is the true beginning of the contemporary 'End of History' debate. Addeddate 2014-12-27 23:00:12 Identifier pdfy-xPoejl7ruL9jyW3_ Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t9768kd8t Ocr ABBYY FineReader 9.0 Ppi 300 Scanner Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3 Kojève argues that Hegel's System needs to be seen as circular and returning to itself. “Let us remember: One book, one pen, one child, and one teacher can change the world.” Kojeve makes everything far more difficult than I think it has to be. Easier going than the phenomenology. One reads Kojeve to discover a living Hegel; most people are content to know that the man and his system are dead. I really enjoyed this book a lot. He writes that Kojève is a "truncated and unsatisfactory jumblings of Hegelian ideas which get a better hearing in the original. Alexandre Kojève is easily … In middle age, I am not so sure. In the first part, Kojève is concerned with rendering accessible Hegel's master-slave dialectic and giving a mythical account of it as the first meeting of two persons. He may perhaps talk about the thing, but he will never talk about himself; in his discourse, the word 'I' will not occur. 0 Ratings 0 Want to read; 0 Currently reading; 0 Have read; This edition published in 1969 by Basic Books in New York. But I think there's something basically correct about Kojeve's decision to emphasise labour, desire, and struggle. This is more like a 2.5 reasons include Kojeve's tendency to overcomplicate Hegel, as well as my disagreement with him on a couple of factors of interpretation. 3. — 287 pages This edition doesn't have a description yet. Not Hegel but "Kojeve's Hegel": interesting, but best taken with a grain of salt if you want to understand what Hegel actually means. I have a background in Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, and an intense fascination with the idea of the master-slave dialectic, so I thought this book would be well worth a try. Not in Library. History & truth in Hegel's Phenomenology / by: Westphal, Merold. “Indeed, we all know that the man who attentively contemplates a thing, who wants to see it as it is without changing anything, is 'absorbed,' so to speak, by this contemplation -- i.e., by this thing. Still, our arguments about it were fun. Alexandre Kojève was a Russian-born French philosopher and statesman whose philosophical seminars had an immense influence on twentieth-century French philosophy, particularly via his integration of Hegelian concepts into continental philosophy. The deficiencies, but also the merits, of a such an approach are acutely felt after encountering the Introduction to the Reading of Hegel (Lectures on the "Phenomenology of Spirit," given from 1933 to 1939 at L'Ecole des hautes Etudes, collected and edited by Raymond Queneau, Paris: Gallimard, 1947. The problem is that he completely misses the point of the ontological. Outline of G.W.F. [6], In Jon Stewart's anthology The Hegel Myths and Legends (1996), Introduction to the Reading of Hegel is listed as a work that has propagated "myths" about Hegel. Alexandre Kojève was a Russian-born French philosopher and statesman whose philosophical seminars had an immense influence on twentieth-century French philosophy, particularly via his integration of Hegelian concepts into continental philosophy. if you like it, try hegel. It reminded me very much of C.S. I was surprised by the Heideggerian undertone. As a statesman in the French government, he was instrumental in the creation of the European Union. Whether that makes it a good introduction, I'm not sure, as Kojeve is clearly indebted to other thinkers like Heidegger, and not afraid to declare his suffered with Hegel on e.g. If you have not read the Phenomenology of Spirit, you just have to believe Kojeve. At the very least, it's worthwhile to read someone who extracts from Hegel so much of what figures like Marx, Sartre and Lacan saw in him. Once you read this mess, you’ll see all the myths about Hegel are based on Kojeves poor reading. My interpretation of Kojève's mythologized account was that the encounter is supposed to represent the inevitable power struggle that happens between peoples with competing interests. Kojève then proceeds to the relation of Hegel's system of absolute knowledge to the systems offered by Parmenides-Spinoza, Aristotle, Plato, and Kant. It's more complicated than that. Refresh and try again. People love saying how accessible Kojeve's reading of Hegel is and then pointing out that Kojeve's Hegel isn't really Hegel at all. dialectics in nature. We’d love your help. Takes the Master/Slave dialectic and pretends like its the key of the system (spoiler alert: its not). The system I can do without (I remain Kierkegaardian in that sense); but the man, his insights, his intelligence...the *Phenomenology* is itself required reading for those aspects alone. This substructure, which supports both religion and philosophy, is nothing but the totality of human actions realized during the course of universal history, that history in and by which man has created a series of specifically human worlds, essentially different from the natural world. Also I don't think he's right in interpreting Hegel as an atheist. Kojève was a close friend of, and was in lifelong. Kojève develops many themes that would be fundamental to existentialism and French theory such as the end of history and the Master-Slave Dialectic. One reads Kojeve to discover a living Hegel; most people are content to know that the man and his system are dead. Introduction to the reading of Hegel Alexandre Kojève Introduction to the reading of Hegel × Close. In his lectures, Kojève explains the first and one of the most famous works of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel - the book "Phenomenology of. However, once Kojeve gets going about the "Wise Man" and the "End of History" I had the complete opposite reaction. Kojève spends quite a few pages developing the master-slave dialectic theme and drawing out its consequences. Kojeve's commentary on Hegel's *Phenomenology* is a brilliant example of what Emerson termed "creative reading"--a skill cultivated by far too few.

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